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Sessler's Soapbox: Revisiting the Classics

Posted: September 27, 2011
Sessler's Soapbox: Revisiting the Classics
http://www.g4tv.com/videos/55452/sesslers-soapbox-revisiting-the-classics/
http://images.g4tv.com/ImageDb3/283825_LGST/soapbox-9-27-11.jpg
Video_55452
Adam talks about all the remastered collections coming out these days and how older games, as great as they are, can remind us how much gaming has changed.

Comments are Closed

  • Fatty_Matty

    I feel the same way with the Mass Effect series. I know I've tried at least once or twice to go back to the first game and start up a new story, but then immediately get frustrated not just by the differences in game play, but also in knowing the improvements made in the next installment of the series. How can I possibly endure another half-hour elevator ride when I know the developers have taken care of this issue in game number two? I'm sure the same thing will happen when Mass Effect three comes out and I try to go back to the previous game only to be reminded of just how badly I hate being a geological surveyor.
    Also, I noticed this evolution of gaming concept in your previous soapbox as well when you were talking about the previous games in the Gears of War series and how frustrating it is that they were not as polished as the last game. I find it funny that we can play a game and be absolutely amazed by it, then play the sequel two years later and be just as amazed as when we played the first game, like Mass Effect. But then we go back to game number one and become slightly confused as to why we praised this game so much when it has so many flaws and annoyances in its design. And then there are games like Ico where we don't look at the game in such a negative light, but we are confused as to how to play the thing because its been so long sic we've played a game like this.
    I could say more, but people are trying to interact with me, so I will continue this later.

    Posted: December 2, 2011 8:48 PM
    Fatty_Matty
  • metallaw

    I recently played Shadow for the first time. Ridiculously frustrating and unfun. Great art, spirtual visions, impressive worlds, and unique voices can be wonderful in gaming, but if the game isn't fun to play, it's still not worth anything. It's like a beautiful car that stops every one mile, interesting as a curiosity but it will not get you from point A to point B.

    And the whole reason it wasn't fun? The same old problem of game design being too frustrating, and having to redo massive stretches of game play if you fall once.

    It's not about age, Ratchet and Clank hold up wonderfully, while Jak and Shadow fall into the realm of needlessly frustrating. One reason people don't give for HALO's ascendancy is that it was simply much easier to play, and people could enjoy it and finish

    Posted: October 14, 2011 5:14 PM
    metallaw
  • MisterBrown

    Shadow of the Colossus ages well, though, or at least it has for the past five years. I don't believe it's about the mechanics, but the art that surrounds them. While the battling is essential to it being a game, the loneliness and mystery that engulf the player in this rich yet barren landscape is what makes the title an experience. Adam is always talking about enjoying the "world of the game"; very few titles do it as well as Shadow of the Colossus, and I believe that this will be a key factor in the game living on after future technologies allow its mechanics to be well surpassed.

    Posted: October 5, 2011 7:19 PM
    MisterBrown
  • MisterBrown

    Shadow of the Colossus ages well, though, or at least it has for the past five years. I don't believe it's about the mechanics, but the art that surrounds them. While the battling is essential to it being a game, the loneliness and mystery that engulf the player in this rich yet barren landscape is what makes the title an experience. Adam is always talking about enjoying the "world of the game"; very few titles do it as well as Shadow of the Colossus, and I believe that this will be a key factor in the game living on after future technologies allow its mechanics to be well surpassed.

    Posted: October 5, 2011 7:15 PM
    MisterBrown
  • MisterBrown

    Shadow of the Colossus ages well, though, or at least it has for the past five years. I don't believe it's about the mechanics, but the art that surrounds them. While the battling is essential to it being a game, the loneliness and mystery that engulf the player in this rich yet barren landscape is what makes the title an experience. Adam is always talking about enjoying the "world of the game"; very few titles do it as well as Shadow of the Colossus, and I believe that this will be a key factor in the game living on after future technologies allow its mechanics to be well surpassed.

    Posted: October 5, 2011 7:12 PM
    MisterBrown
  • MLoad

    I never got to play through Ico so I picked up the remaster and I must say I enjoyed it but there were some frustrating times that Adam pointed out but, it was fun to look back and think about where "modern" games came from. There were a ton of times while playing I kept thinking that this area felt like it could be in Demon's Souls and the next area would feel like Uncharted. It was kind of amazing and I can't even imagine what it would have been like playing Ico on lauch day! I cannot wait for The Last Guardian!

    Posted: October 3, 2011 4:16 PM
    MLoad
  • T00MSDAY

    Totally agree about the Mass Effect reference. The inventory management of the past is...well... archaic.

    Posted: September 30, 2011 12:59 PM
    T00MSDAY
  • overkill13

    I've actually been going back and playing some of the classics on the Wii Virtual Console. SNES RPGs play just like I remember and are just as good now. I've also been playing some old FPS and 3PSs (Modern Warfare 2, Army of Two, Rainbow Six Vegas, etc) with my friend. Also just as enjoyable now as before. I don't think I suffer from the gaming language loss that you describe. I've had issues with control mixups and some really minor issues with going back to previous gameplay mechanics, but for the most part the games just play well and are enjoyable.

    Posted: September 29, 2011 8:45 PM
    overkill13
  • slowbreakdown

    he is completely describing every point i was trying to make when i was telling my friend why i didn't really enjoy playing theses games. The design is so antiquated that it is very difficult to play while using current generation game logic.

    Posted: September 29, 2011 8:43 PM
    slowbreakdown
  • Pitstop

    Every now and then I'll see an episode of The Brady Bunch on TV and I'll think "Wow, I actually liked that when I was a kid?" Games are the same way sometimes. A lot of it depends on the type of game, I think. I truly loved Doom 2, but to go back and play it now after playing so many modern FPS games is very hard to do. On the other hand, a simple game like Galaga is still a blast to play even now.

    Also, I think it's not always because it's like a different language, so to speak, but because of the limits of technology at any given time. I don't just mean graphics, either. Modern games can have better AI, more immersive worlds, better controllers, and so on. There's just so many more factors to consider about a game that's interactive as opposed to something like a book or a movie.

    It's often hard to go back and recapture that feeling you had when a game was new and exciting. It makes me wonder why I still have so many of my old games and systems lying around. Nostalgia leads to clutter!

    On a side note, I, too, recently found myself wanting to play Shadow of the Colossus again... not because of the new game or the collection coming out (as I do not own a PS3)... but because I was playing Castlevania: Lords of Shadow.

    Posted: September 29, 2011 1:31 PM
    Pitstop
  • FaYt2021

    So nice I had to watch it twice... mostly because I was distracted by Sly the first time around.

    Posted: September 29, 2011 6:58 AM
    FaYt2021
  • Andy_Davies

    The analogy of game logic and language is perfectly apropos. It underlines the player and creator dynamic. When you play a game it's like a conversation, especially in a game like shadow of colossus. The game maker has given the player a task/puzzle, and is trying to tell the player what to do in a subtle way. If the game maker is to explicit the player losses the sense of immersion because the player will no longer feel ownership to the solution of the task. If the game maker is to obtuse the task solution will seem adventitious because the problem will not feel well integrated into the game world , breaking immersion again. In order to balance this dynamic the game makers and players establish a conversation that allows the process to flow smoothly. Not only has the vernacular changed over the years, but also the tone of this conversation. Just take the game playing in your background sly cooper for example. The first slay cooper had limited lives and you had to work hard to unlock all the abilities. I finished the game with only half of sly's capabilities. In sly 2 there where infinite lives and by watching my little six year old sisters play, if you die a large amount of times at a particular spot, the the game will move you past that point. All the abilities are naturally obtained without extended effort. The tone has shifted from "you have to earn this by working hard and show perseverance in the face of adversity", so you can have pride in your accomplishments, to a tone that was more relaxed and emphasized the point that this is a game and your supposed to be having fun, so go out and have fun like a kid. I think this shift in tone was a healthy change in gaming, not only does it allow a wider audience to play, it underscores the points of video games.

    Posted: September 28, 2011 5:46 PM
  • skweejal

    Thank god Adam is around. He explains things in a way that could get the biggest of life-noobs, to become a well educated life-winner.

    Posted: September 28, 2011 1:22 PM
  • DarkSausage

    *Anyways old video games still hold credit, just because they aren't designed as good as they are now, doesn't mean I won't go back and play Half-Life just cause its that good.*

    Posted: September 28, 2011 11:12 AM
    DarkSausage
  • DarkSausage

    I feel like older games were harder back in the day compared to now where the game holds your hand through every new situation. But I mean how many people actually play recent games on harder difficulties.

    I personally love to revisit old titles that I used to play, I still have that muscle memory and know where I need to go. Not only that I usually get better at the game each time I revisit it. A month ago I got a playstation emulator and have been playing Digimon world 1 & 2 also FF 7/9. I've been having a blast playing these games. I noticed especially in digimon world 2 the battles are sooooooooo slow, but thanks to the emulator I can make it speed up.

    Anyways old video games still hold credit, just because they aren't designed as good as they are now, doesn't mean I will go back and play Half-Life just cause its that good.

    Posted: September 28, 2011 11:11 AM
    DarkSausage
  • snilloCnotloC

    Hardcore JRPG fanboy right here. Wheres Bioware in your list man? Or Naughty Dog? The franchises of Mass Effect, KOTOR, and Uncharted are some of the best storys in games to date. Not to mention Bioshock. MGS is awesome to though.

    Posted: September 28, 2011 11:07 AM
    snilloCnotloC
  • sweetnsticky420

    Yea most games now the story sucks. I really miss the greatness of the directing for example Gears of War is just unreal tournament in 3rd person. When I played it I thought the story and acting was as bland as games could get. It really looks like the only ppl who can direct a have a good enough story for games are. Hideo Kojima, Shuyo Murata, Mineshi Kimura(Directors of Metal Gear Franchise) Yoshinori Kitase(Director of FF VII)Motomu Toriyama, Takayoshi Nakazato, Toshiro Tsuchida(Directors of FF X), Medal of honor story Director The Red White and Blue XD

    Posted: September 28, 2011 7:58 AM
    sweetnsticky420
  • Knockdownisland

    Theres nothing i hate more in video games than when they show you where to go and how to get there before you even have a chance to try yourself. Like in resident evil 4 when you got to the ending boss it takes a minute to realize you have to shoot the eyes then jump on him and stab him but in RE5 its like how do i kill this guy?oh cutscene that points his glowing weakspot. I cant hit it from here though? oh cutscene to a ladder that takes you to a sniper position this game is so awesome...........

    Posted: September 28, 2011 5:35 AM
    Knockdownisland
  • Alien_Number_Six

    I agree with Adam sometimes they switch things up on you with the sequels. In Dead Space the stasis button changed between one and two. Reloading when you want to freeze something got frustrating for a few moments until I lived up to the learning curve.

    Posted: September 28, 2011 4:21 AM
    Alien_Number_Six
  • RPG-fan

    Most games today are more streamlined compared to games from yesteryear because a majority of gamers today want their hands held and want features like regenerating health, auto-aiming or glowing markers to point where to go.

    Posted: September 27, 2011 11:59 PM
    RPG-fan
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