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Sessler's Soapbox: Best Foot Forward

Posted: August 30, 2011
Sessler's Soapbox: Best Foot Forward
http://www.g4tv.com/videos/55010/sesslers-soapbox-best-foot-forward/
http://images.g4tv.com/ImageDb3/281949_LGST/soapbox-8-30-11.jpg
Video_55010
Sessler talks about the how the beginning of a game can often make or break your gaming experience, like in Deus Ex: Human Revolution.

Comments are Closed

  • Moeez

    I don't understand Sessler's point, because whichever upgrades you go with in the game, you're not at a disadvantage and there are plenty of ways to get Praxis points (buy them at LIMB clinic, complete side-quests, try "Ghost" and "Smooth Operator" bonuses during missions, selling stuff to get more money to buy Praxis points again).

    The only time you're at a disadvantage with your certain build can be during boss battles, which are out-of-place and as documented, they were outsourced to a company (GRIP) who had no clue what kind of design philosophy belies a Deus Ex game. But even during those battles: 1st boss can be beaten by just throwing gas and explosive barrels; 2nd boss just by shooting the electric panels on the wall; 3rd boss battle just by being in the right position for when he climbs over a wall and punching him in 1 hit, I'm not kidding (http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=4v1X5F0d58I).

    Other than that, nearly all the upgrades are USEFUL unlike most RPGs. By 3/4 of the game, you can have upgrades into every attribute. This is more Adam's projection than actual criticism of game design. Have to disagree with the Sess.

    Posted: September 20, 2011 4:29 AM
    Moeez
  • Quixotic_Noble

    I like choices in games. Whether its moral ambiguity of character/plot decisions or points to apply to RPG attributes they must be significantly different from one another to garner a multiple playthroughs. At the moment despite enjoying Deus Ex, I don't think my choices are distinct enough to warrant an immediate replay. Maybe months down the road but I am very busy with other responiblites that in order for me to replay a game it has to be significantly different experience from the first.

    Posted: September 10, 2011 9:45 AM
    Quixotic_Noble
  • Dorkenmore

    I totally respect your opinion Adam, but I have to disagree with you.

    In games like Fallout and Oblivion, I can totally concede to that, but Deus Ex: Human Revolution is NOT one of those games. Want to know why? In Oblivion and Fallout 3, you pretty much have to decide what you are going to be before the game gets going, but in Deus Ex: HR, the game never forces you to use your experience (praxis) points until you want to use them. When I started the game up for the first time, as soon as I could, I took a look and read all of the descriptions of the augmentation upgrades and told myself "alright, I am going to hold on to all of my praxis points until I run into a situation where an upgrade is required. I NEVER had a problem not being able to accomplish what I wanted at any given time because I was actually careful about character development.

    After hearing he had issues with the original Deus Ex in the same department, I literally laughed out loud. This is what is so brilliant about the Deus Ex games. Even if I completely screw up my character in every way with upgrading, there is still going to be a way to get through each situation. Period. It may not be the one you wanted, but then you probably should have saved points so that you could utilize them when you actually needed an upgrade. Also, the experience points that exist in the original game could be used at any time as well. Using Adam's example, with swimming, if one didn't know how effective putting points into swimming would be, then maybe he or she should have splashed around a bit before committing to an upgrade

    The issue I have with Adam's opinion is that he is asking for gameplay-based hand-holding. Tutorials are one thing, but I don't want to be hand-held. I don't want things to be totally crystal clear all of the time so I can DISCOVER the necessity of each upgrade instead of merely being spoon-fed. If you are essentially told exactly how useful everything is going to be, then you might as well just go play a standard shooter, At that point, what to focus on in upgrading your character isn't a player choice, its just a matter of shallow calculated problem solving. In the end, my character ended up exactly the way I wanted it (on the first play-through, mind you), and I was totally satisfied, but that's because I had to make decisions of what I wanted to specialize in AFTER I figured out its functionality.

    I want these kinds of game to really tax my brain. I want them to have to make me really really think about everything I do. Gameplay-wise, that is what makes an RPG a great one.

    Posted: September 9, 2011 4:55 PM
    Dorkenmore
  • deusex2

    Sorry, but I'm just not agree with Adam in this, particular case(he is 100% right about the original Deus Ex, though). At the end of the game I had ALL the upgrades, except for the markings in the stealth tree. So ultimately, there was very little difference.

    Besides, like Adam said, most of the choices were obvious and those that weren't, well, there were plenty of guides almost right away. And even without of it, some choices were more or less common sense(hacking, for example, with all the locks and terminals around)

    Posted: September 7, 2011 3:34 PM
    deusex2
  • Zetsuei

    His opinions are often extremely retarded.

    Posted: September 5, 2011 4:18 PM
    Zetsuei
  • PMoore93

    I loved the beginning of this game (along with the rest of it too). Is nobody aware there's an option to read a very detailed description of each augmentation. And no matter what augment you use your praxis points on there is always a way to complete the objective (maybe if your hacking is too low you have to take everyone out and search them for pocket secretaries or computer passwords). That's part of the replay value, experimenting with each way to get past a part of the game. I'm not going to hate on the people who share this opinion with Adam, but I think it's kind of silly to complain about how your character isn't exactly the way you wanted him to be in an RPG.

    And just to defend the game's beginning really quick, I'm the kind of person who likes to START his character exactly the way I want to. I played the intro of Deus Ex HR about four or five times experimenting with different augs before I actually got going. And after I beat it, I immediately started over and I still really enjoy the opening part of the game. They did a good job at making an interesting opening that sets it up for an amazing game from start to finish.

    Posted: September 5, 2011 4:08 AM
    PMoore93
  • jcruleworld

    I actually understand what he means, yeah you can look and read about what upgrades are but that always isn't the case. You want to be able to know how the ability/upgrade feels like before you use it cause with that game you have a choice from the beginning do you want to be a killer or do you want to sneak by and put them to sleep. Well if you choose sneak you will choose a sneaky upgrades but within the game that's not always what you want to do exactly and that messes up your game.

    Posted: September 4, 2011 8:43 PM
    jcruleworld
  • freechild

    I guess this was a light week for topics....

    Posted: September 4, 2011 8:00 AM
    freechild
  • Eldrich

    Not all games need extreme hand holding. Plus in a RPG, the stress of the decision to an upgrade path makes the game more thrilling. If players want that kind of coddling and hand holding, then they can buy a strategy guide or surf the web that will lay out all the best decisions and optimal choices, but really, life is not like that.

    Also, as a game it promotes additional play throughs in the interest of experimenting with decisions bypassed previously.

    Posted: September 4, 2011 5:24 AM
    Eldrich
  • SKETCHFro

    Happy Birthday Adam! Tweet like you want to! It is your twitter after all.

    Posted: September 4, 2011 2:55 AM
    SKETCHFro
  • burnettbull

    i get adam's point, and have thrown some games in the bin straight away, but this type of thing makes me want to replay a game, making sometimes better choices the 2nd then 3rd time round.

    Posted: September 2, 2011 10:24 AM
    burnettbull
  • HqDropshoT

    if call of duty dosent have stopping power im done with call of duty all toghter it is getting very tireing when it take a whole to kill someone

    Posted: September 1, 2011 10:18 PM
    HqDropshoT
  • silverten

    Sorry about the double post It looks like it s an IE thing However, I still hear the click in the background!

    PS

    Me I m a casual gamer I use to like playing internet spades, until it got to a point where the other players would bail when they had a bad hand, at the 1st round. Might be good against the computer bad against real people!

    Posted: September 1, 2011 8:02 PM
    silverten
  • silverten

    I think this is part 2 of last week's soapbox...

    Since you re focusing on RPG... (Heaven forbid the amount of time you might spend with Halo or other FPS...)

    I think you re not looking at the hard core players -- or even the re-playability factor. For games like Fallout or the other RPGs (I noticed that you didn't include Borderlands), these are meant to be played multiple times... It seems to me that a lot of these games are really for the younger generations that have time on their hands -- even some of the later generation seems to thrive on such games. DLCs also extend these games, but overall, the player really need a certain skill set to get through the adventure. It really seems like or feels like the old text adventures like Zork, the wrong response frustrates, but the right speeds you on your way. To say that you would initially have the right skills to even be able to play hard more is quite wrong.

    Game environments should provide an environment for the player to learn from their mistakes in some cases like the real world. After all, games are the small brother to learning. Unlike the real world, there are always consequences for your wrong decisions (in games) by providing the inappropriate response. I think the people that involve themselves with these kinds of games are quite aware of the time involved in such games.

    BTW: What's with all of the security alerts on your site? It's kind of annoying...

    Posted: September 1, 2011 7:55 PM
    silverten
  • silverten

    I think this is part 2 of last week's soapbox...

    Since you re focusing on RPG... (Heaven forbid the amount of time you might spend with Halo or other FPS...)

    I think you re not looking at the hard core players -- or even the re-playability factor. For games like Fallout or the other RPGs (I noticed that you didn't include Borderlands), these are meant to be played multiple times... It seems to me that a lot of these games are really for the younger generations that have time on their hands -- even some of the later generation seems to thrive on such games. DLCs also extend these games, but overall, the player really need a certain skill set to get through the adventure. It really seems like or feels like the old text adventures like Zork, the wrong response frustrates, but the right speeds you on your way. To say that you would initially have the right skills to even be able to play hard more is quite wrong.

    Game environments should provide an environment for the player to learn from their mistakes in some cases like the real world. After all, games are the small brother to learning. Unlike the real world, there are always consequences for your wrong decisions (in games) by providing the inappropriate response. I think the people that involve themselves with these kinds of games are quite aware of the time involved in such games.

    BTW: What's with all of the security alerts on your site? It's kind of annoying...

    Posted: September 1, 2011 7:53 PM
    silverten
  • lowkevmic

    I don't think it's the game's fault for this and more so the player's misconception of the type of game they are playing. If this was a RPG by strict definition based on older RPG's, then the gamer will take more time to read descriptions, and actually take their time with this game and come up with a good strategy on how to upgrade the player's skills. But because this is an action/shooter with core RPG elements, gamers will feel more inclined to just pick up start shooting, and not really take the same time and attention to detail as they would a straight up RPG.

    I experienced this the first time I picked up Mass Effect. I knew the game was a RPG, but the action was so fast paced, I missed a few details because I was at first treating the game like it was some Arcade shooter and not a RPG.

    Posted: September 1, 2011 10:50 AM
    lowkevmic
  • Spybreak

    I know what you're talking about. It's almost like having an open world game and letting the player go anywhere they want without limiting or blocking areas off. Yeah it's a lot upfront and I did make a few mistakes which didn't let me the ability to complete side quests. Did I restart the game? Heck no, this is Deus Ex!

    Posted: September 1, 2011 12:48 AM
    Spybreak
  • MiraiMi

    The book he quotes from is The Stranger by Albert Camus

    Posted: August 31, 2011 8:50 PM
  • ceedz

    Oh & I like to put over 99hrs on a rpg to play it once, not have to restart from the beginning 8 times before I decide to just keep going!

    Posted: August 31, 2011 12:43 PM
  • ceedz

    HAPPY BIRTHDAY ADAM, I know exactly how you feel especially when you get half way through the game and want to restart. I have not finished Fallout 3 (only by accident, before DLC) & New Vegas cause of having to decide at the beginning, then getting the shaft later in the game because I didn't have enough points. AND the leveling system in Oblivion was a bunch of bull squat. When it comes to RPGs there are the CORE players that are perfectionist. We want to unlock everything, max out our stats, & reach LVL 99 to reach all areas in the game. FF started it but lost direction till FF12 & then with more BS, I love exploring large environments & grinding!

    Posted: August 31, 2011 12:31 PM
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