X

GDC 2012











  • News
    (2)
  • Previews
  • Review
  • Videos
    (2)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (4)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (4)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (1)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

Today on X-Play

Tune in tonight 6:30PM ET on X-Play as we deliver our third of four BioShock Infinite exclusives, and get a first look at assassin revenge title Dishonored. Full show details below:

  • BioShock Infinite Trailer Exclusive
    In the last two weeks, we've unveiled new BioShock Infinite enemies the "Motorized Patriot" and the "Handyman." Today, we'll reveal a third.
  • Dishonored First Look Preview
    Get a first look at Dishonored, the upcoming title that's all about assassinations and revenge from Deus Ex and System Shock designer Harvey Smith and RPG Arx Fatalis designer Raphael Colantonio.
  • MLB 2K12 Video Review
    The baseball game franchise of "Million Dollar Perfect Game" contest fame is back with their annual installment. Find out if it's worth your time in our review.
  • On Location: SXSW ScreenBurn Arcade
    Morgan Webb heads to Austin, TX to get scoop from the ScreenBurn Arcade, SXSW's festival within a festival where game industry announcements are made and new products revealed.
  • PlayStation Move Gameplay Preview
    More Move games are on the way, and we'll check out three: Sorcery, Datura, and PixelJunk 4am.
  • Games on the Go: Best iPad Sports Games
    Just in time for Apple's latest version of the iPad, get our picks for best sports games to take on the go.

Watch X-Play weekdays at 6:30PM ET, only on G4!








  • Videos
    (12)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (12)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (12)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (4)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (4)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs





Tune in this Monday at 6:30PM ET as an all-new week of X-Play unveils our third of four BioShock Infinite exclusives, and reveals a look at first footage from Dishonored.

Plus, reviews of I Am Alive and MLB 2K12, and Morgan Webb rounds up all the action from SXSW in Austin, TX.

We'll also check out the next batch of PlayStation Move titles, get an early look at Dragon's Dogma, and head up to Ubisoft Montreal to hang with the developers of Assassin's Creed and Far Cry. All this and so much more when a brand new week of X-Play starts this Monday at 6:30PM ET!

Coming Up On X-Play - Week of 3/19 »





Sid Meier's Civilization V Set To Destroy Lives This Fall

Back in 1989, game developer Sid Meier said that “Games are a series of interesting decisions,” which is completely obvious when you’re playing a game like Civilization, where decision gates are often laid out in black and white for you when choosing things like what technology to develop.

But it’s less obvious that you’re making choices like this that affect your gameplay experience in everything you play, from Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 to Angry Birds. While it might seem like a no-brainer to look at games like that, it’s something that Meier wants more developers to pay attention to during the development process.

He broke down his now-famous quote into several different pieces for the audience at GDC: What makes a decision interesting? What are the actual decisions that the player is being asked to make? He also referenced the question that all developers ask themselves during the debug process, “Why did we choose to make this game?” If you ask yourself that question too often, then you might need to abandon ship and start over.

Read More »



  • News
    (5)
  • Previews
  • Review

Developers took to the stage to close out GDC with their infamous rant session. This year, the rants took on the theme of "parenting" with many of those who first started coding late at night now changing diapers or telling their own kids to get off the computer.

Their message is simple – the game industry needs to grow up. In order for things to change, the developers of today and of the next generation need to act quickly or find themselves in a spiral of mediocrity. But like any parent, they know that their words must be firm, but with a sliver of hope. The speakers on that panel, from Chris Heckler to Jade Raymond, demand change not just for themselves, but for the future of the industry and for their children.

The Biggest Achievement Stumbling Block For Halo Fans: Halo Wars?

Graeme Devine (GRL Games)

“We suck!”

The printed words hung up there in the air for everyone to see. Graeme sees an industry afraid of change. With his 17-year old just entering the industry, he fears for her future. Console games only sell three types of games: FPS, RTS, and RPG. Anything else is too risky according to this developer whose games include Halo Wars, The 7th Guest, and Quake III Arena. Publishers take on the often-risky indie developers, but only first their first game. When that second or third game begins to roll out, we often leave our rising stars stranded. And as world of mobile goes the way of freemium, more pressure is put on the developer to deliver content even after the game ships. In the pursuit of the all mighty dollar, we sacrifice substance and variety within the industry.

Graeme concludes that we should bring back the 80’s, a time when games were young and ideas ran wild. Companies like Atari used to embrace new games and new ideas. With the old programmers now the studio heads, we have the power to make a change. Bring back the 80’s!

Read More »

Pong

John Romero, Cliff Bleszinki, Sid Meier, and Will Wright talk about the videogames that inspired them as young game designers during the Forgotten Tales Remembered: The Games That Inspired Leading Innovators panel at GDC 2012. From Pong to Seven Cities of Gold to The Legend of Zelda, find out what these gaming luminaries played growing up, and what influenced the games you play and love today. 

Every year design students and professionals flock to the Game Developers Conference to soak in knowledge and advice on how to get started and improve in the games industry. Innovators like John Romero, Cliff Bleszinski, Sid Meier and Will Wright serve as senior figures whose words will be analyzed and digested by attendees attempting to glean knowledge. But what were the games and the developers who provided that same inspiration and wisdom to the senior figures of today?

Will Wright got his Apple II back in 1980, in a day when every game was almost its own genre. Bruce Artwick's FW1 Flight Simulator introduced Wright to wireframe graphics, Choplifter showed that you could rescue people and not just kill them, and “Sundog was almost like the first Grand Theft Auto, but you were in a spaceship,” Wright said.

Read More »

ADVERTISEMENT

Gears of War 3

Game developers Cliff Bleszinski from Epic Games and Amy Henning from Naughty Dog know a thing or two about videogames, and during the Microtalks at GDC 2012, they and others discussed the idea of time, and how it influcences game design. 

If you've ever wondered what what Cliff Bleszinki's rules are for starting out in the videogame industry, read on to find out what he -- and other great videogame minds -- think about the topic of time. 

Between running all over the place for preview events, dealing with the massive block lengths in San Francisco and the crunch of deadlines, I haven’t had time to see many panels at GDC. Thankfully I was able to cover the conference’s famous microtalks—in which ten developers and influential industry figures are given just twenty slides that can only be displayed for 16 seconds each to talk about a theme. The theme this year was “playing for time,” which, as Richard Lemarchand said, is largely about uncertain futures.

Richard Lemarchand – Designer, Naughty Dog

Lemarchand introduced us to the theme of playing for time, explaining the point of the subject matter would hopefully spur building something with value and a legacy.

“Are we building games that have some lasting value, that respect people’s time and give them new ways at looking the world? Embracing play as an important, powerful aspect of life that can help bring friends and family closer and help to learn more about what it means to be human?”

Read More »


SimCity

Leading up to GDC 2012, one of the big rumors as far as reveals was that EA and Maxis would unveil a new SimCity game. Well, as you’ve probably seen by now, that’s exactly what happened. However, despite holding a special press event to officially unveil the game, neither EA nor Maxis talked at all about the game itself or provide any details regarding its development, aside from showing a pre-rendered target concept/SimCity announcement trailer.

Instead, EA relegated said info that people wanted to a lately added panel entitled "Inside the Glassbox,” a largely technical-based presentation about Maxis’ new simulation engine that powers the SimCity. For someone like me (i.e. someone with zero understanding of the inner workings of a computer simulation engine), it was a rather dense discussion to wade through.

Thankfully, the elegance and conciseness of the Glassbox engine itself, and the fundamental building blocks that drive it, made the presentation of the simulation elements, and even the code behind it, actually quite entertaining and educational. Better still, it made me genuinely excited about SimCity, a franchise that has held little appeal for me since I first played the original way back when.

Read More »

Saint’s Row The Third Postmorte

Love it or hate it, Saint’s Row: The Third was one of the most over-the-top, bat-crap crazy games of 2011. An SR 3 level of finely tuned insanity doesn't happen by chance; it comes from careful planning, tons of hard work, and the kind of eureka! moment that can only spring from a giant purple dildo bat used as a weapon.

Design Director at Volition, Scott Phillips gave a talk at the Game Developer’s Conference 2012 about how they managed to go as over the top as they did, without going too far. The talk covered three main sections: Setting the Tone, Raising the Bar, and Scope Control; making for one of the most interesting panels we’ve seen so far.

Read More »


  • Videos
    (24)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (26)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

 Minecraft

Marcuss Persson, better known to the gaming community as Notch, is the man who created a world one block at a time, and an indie empire to go along with it, in the cultural phenomenon that is Minecraft. Notch sat down with Chris Hecker from definition six, inc at GDC 2012 to break down the very elements of what made Minecraft a huge success as well as the future for both him and the game itself as it continues to grow on the PC and comes to life on XBLA. In his talk, the developer reveals how by doing less you encouraged others to do more, and that there are still some secrets still left in Minecraft.

In keeping with the spirit of Minecraft, here are few choice conversation building blocks summarizing the big takeaways Notch presented during his discussion.

1. If a tree falls in a forest, does it make a sound? Not in Minecraft. Actually, trees don’t fall in Minecraft. Chop away at the middle of the tree and the rest remains in place. Notch chooses simplicity over simulation to keep the work from becoming too complex. The foundation of the game is rooted in serious physics while additions over time get to be a little more whimsical. In order to fulfill the theme of an epic fantasy, the ambitious developer balanced simulation with the abstract.

Read More »


A few new SimCity videos have appeared online that were shot at the Maxis panel during GDC 2012. Of course these SimCity videos don't feature the final art of the game, but it's still cool to see the title in action after we've been waiting so long for the next iteration.



You can find another SimCity video after the break.

Read More »


  • Videos
    (8)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

Fez

The innovative perspective-shifting platformer Fez won the grand prize of $30,000 at the 14th annual Independent Games Festival (IGF), hosted by GDC. Fez is the upcoming indie game that has everything you could ask for: great visuals, music, and of course, design. According to our Indie game expert Rob Manuel, "Fez represents not only what makes an indie game great, but also what makes gaming great."

Other winners included developer Daniel Benmergui for his work on the comic strip-based game Storyteller. He won the Nuovo Award, given to developers who advance the medium and way we think about games, and a $5,000 cash prize. Storyteller lets players drop characters into story panels, and the characters will react according to their personality traits. Neat!

You can find the full list of winners after the break.

Read More »

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Videos
    (1)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

PixelJunk 4am Makes You The Performer This Spring

Check out our preview of PixelJunk 4AM. It's an intriguing game, and not only did we get to hands-on with the title, but we also got an interview with Japense DJ Baiyon who worked on the game. Check out a taste of our PixelJunk 4AM preview.

"If PixelJunk 4am sounds trippy, that's a fair assessment. It is not, however, outrageous. The controls are tricky: After trying to jump right into the game I had to ask for the tutorials, and even then had some trouble grasping the fundamentals. 4am is simply unlike any game I've ever played before. Cynical critics may say it isn't a videogame at all, but 4am is yet another in a rising tide of video games that argue for a transcendent definition of what a video game actually is, and make the argument that it's more like a canvas upon which creators may paint their creations. In the case of PixelJunk 4am, that's literally what the point is."

Read our full PixelJunk 4AM preview.







Batman: Arkham City

We got a behind-the-scenes look at the making of Batman: Arkham City at GDC 2012, and how the developers took the journey from the Asylum and in to the city. The presentation began with Rocksteady's art director David Hego playing a clip from Arkham Asylum, bringing us back to 2009, when the city was just a very curious object in the distance. Both Batman and the player could gaze at the city, in the hopes of one day crossing that river and kicking some urban ass; and we would do so two years later. In a very concise 30-minute presentation, David went over the many key points in going from the asylum to the city.

Of the valuable lessons learned, he briefly touch upon the effectiveness of modular assets. That was coupled with the constant and seemingly obvious reminder that Batman is very cool and to make sure the player truly felt like Batman. He continued to make very sensible statements regarding how gameplay is king and how art supports that gameplay. With that kind of foundation, Rocksteady had 27 AAA skilled (many veteran) artists on board going into Batman: Arkham City.

Across both games, creating the Arkhamverse was the result of six years of work and Rocksteady's privileged take on the Batman universe. It was key to put in as much of Batman's DNA as possible, where there was no such thing as being too super referential. Working off a canvas to create the world, Rocksteady looked to Gothic architecture and Victorian vertical designs first in Arkham Asylum and continuing this with Arkham City. This also resulted in having a lot of Art Nouveau throughout the city. While the Batman universe is traditionally seen as very American, that did not stop Rocksteady from giving their world a very French and English style.

Read More »

Gauntlet Postmortem: “Wizard Needs Food!”

In this Gauntlet Postmortem from GDC 2012, Ed Logg told us all about what went in to making the classic arcade adventure.

Logg joined Atari in 1978 after getting in trouble with his previous employers for working on video games on the side, and worked on a slew of games for Atari including Super Breakout, Video Pinball, Asteroids, Centipede, Millipede, Xybots, Space Lords and Steel Talons among others.

In the cop-op industry, games were entirely completed for a field test. “If you don't get enough quarters, your game is dead,” Logg said. Those field test units had no marketing whatsoever, and 50-66% of games didn't get past their field test. Logg was chiefly responsible for 12 games for Atari, but only Asteroid, Centipede and Gauntlet were hits.

Logg drew from many different sources for his ideas. Atari had brainstorming sessions a few times a year, which Logg didn't find very useful. Centipede came from a game called Bug Shooter which Logg had assigned to a new hire.

Managers also had ideas, which is where Asteroid came from, and sometimes the programmers brainstormed among themselves, which is how Gauntlet was conceived.

Specifically, Gauntlet came about because Logg's son played Dungeons and Dragons, and had been bothering Logg for a year to make a D&D game. “I played Dandy on an Atari 800 and the bells went off,” Logg said. Dandy represented players in a dungeon using the numbers 1, 2, 3 and 4, had monster generators, used money for treasure and red crosses for food, and had doors and keys, all elements which formed the core of Gauntlet gameplay.

Read More »


You might remember back in 2006 when David Cage and his team at Quantic Dream released a short video called “The Casting.” It was a brief yet powerful scene designed to show off the developer’s latest experiments with performance capture. It had nothing to do with the game they were working on at the time—which ended up being Heavy Rain—but rather it was a way to demonstrate their vision for what new technology could allow them to deliver in terms of storytelling and performance; for a refresher, you can watch it here.

At GDC 2012, Cage took to the stage to give the world its first look at Quantic Dream’s newest test piece entitled “Kara.” Similar to “The Casting,” the video is a standalone story that doesn’t (but would be so awesome if it did) represent what the team is working on next. It’s just something designed to showcase what Quantic Dream has been up to since it finished development on Heavy Rain back in 2010. And if you’ve seen the piece, then you know it packs a mighty impressive punch.

Read More »

Newer Posts | | Older Posts

ADVERTISEMENT

  • Feedback: Medal of Honor Warfighter, SimCity & Mass Effect 3

    Posted: March 14, 2012

    16,713 Views | 35:37

AdChoices