X

GDC 2011




SSX Deadly Descents

At its GamesCom 2011 press conference this morning, EA revealed some of the details of SSX's multiplayer functionality. The snowboarding game's online system is called RiderNet, and online play will be split into two categories: Explore mode and Global Events.

SSX will allow you to compete against other players -- your friends and strangers -- in a number of ways. You'll be able to race against other players' ghosts, even if they are not online, as well as competing in traditional leaderboard battles. The Global Events mode makes snowboarding massive, allowing up to 100,000 players to be online at once, riding in different events that you can jump into at any time, as well as allowing you to create your own events.

RiderNet will allow you to "rate" snowboarding drops, and then recomend other runs you might enjoy, based on your preferences. You'll also be able to keep track of your snowboarding pals, as well as make new friends using Ridernet.

The footage shown during the press conference was pretty "gnarly," as the snowboarders say, and we'll have it up for you on our site pretty soon, so watch out for it!

SSX is scheduled for release in January for Xbox 360 and PS3.


Happy Thirsty Thursday everyone! It's time for your favorite bearded beer snob, Casey Schreiner, to let you know what's going on in the world of MMOs. This week he'll discuss what Guild Wars 2 was showing at GDC, how the Bungie MMO rumor was just a (poorly executed) joke, and of course he'll read some submissions from Uncle Casey's Mail Bag. Enjoy!

The MMO Report: Thursday, March 10th »



Subscribe to G4's WEB SHOWS Video Podcast:




  • Videos
    (5)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • News
    (2)
  • Previews
  • Review
  • Videos
    (1)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • News
    (2)
  • Previews
  • Review
  • Videos
    (1)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • News
    (2)
  • Previews
  • Review
  • Videos
    (1)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

Transformers: Dark of the Moon "Story Preview" »


Transformers: Dark of the Moon isn’t your typical movie tie-in game, primarily because it tells a completely independent, yet still relevant, story set between the first two Transformers movies. The prequel also introduces a host of new features and transformers for players to unleash mechanized hell with when the game ships in a few months. We had a chance to see the game at GDC 2011, and here’s a quick look at one of the big new elements, Stealthforce:

"The biggest new addition to the gameplay this time around is called Stealthforce, and it's nothing like what it sounds like. It basically allows players to transform into a hybrid state between robot and vehicle in which the player has access to weapons while in vehicle form, eliminating the need to complete transform out of vehicle mode to take down enemies."

Read our full Transformers: Dark of the Moon first look impressions for all the details.


The Secret World GDC 2011 Demo Video »


Funcom presented a lengthy demonstration of its conspiracy-rich, Lovecraftian MMO The Secret World at GDC last week, and we were in attendance to capture the entire panel presentation. Luckily for you, we remembered to hit record on our cameras, because what we saw was pretty darn intriguing. With a mix of classic MMO designs, alternate reality fantasy, and brain-twisting investigations that will take you beyond the confines of the game world to solve, The Secret World certainly has us wanting to know a lot more. After you check out the above video, chances are you will be right there with us.

For some more detailed analysis, be sure to check out Eric Eckstein's Secret World panel demonstration impressions article.

You can also see the newest gameplay trailer for the game after the break.

Read More »













Greetings Feed faithful! It’s that time of the week again, and even though our skilled team is still recovering from GDC and in the process of prepping for PAX this weekend (whew!), we knew you’d just be a wreck if you didn’t get your Feedback fix. And to be honest, so would we.

So this week, host Adam Sessler welcomes Matt Keil, Stephen Johnson, and Nikole Zivalich to chat about the highlights from this year’s Game Developers Conference, including Battlefield 3, Reckoning: Kingdom of Amalur, Dead Island and more, as well as what we are looking forward to at PAX. The gamer gang also discusses the game of the week, Dragon Age II, and dissects the missteps, the missed opportunities, and the sadly overshadowed successes of BioWare’s latest fantasy epic.

Feedback -- The Pros & Cons In Dragon Age 2 »


 
Feedback: Slaying dragons and having deeply philosophical debates with our faces covered in darkspawn blood since 1979.
 
The AUDIO MP3 of this episode of FEEDBACK is available here: Right-click and Save.
ADVERTISEMENT

Uncharted 3: Drake's Deception "Katherine Marlowe" Trailer »


Naughty Dog has officially revealed the main villain that dashing explorer Nathan Drake will be matching wits with in Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception, and her name is Katherine Marlowe.

We don’t know too much about Marlowe at this point, but Naughty Dog did reveal a little about her tactics and relationship with Drake during GDC 2011. She will be more about psychological warfare (i.e. deception), and she’s actually known Drake longer than any previous villain he’s faced before.

Intriguing, no? Check out our Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception GDC Preview for more details.

G4 Is Heading To GDC 2011!

GDC 2012's dates have been announced. The 26th annual Game Developers Conference will take place between Monday, March 5 and Friday, March 9, 2012.

As you're no doubt aware, last week was Game Developers Conference 2011. Here's our site with all the GDC 2011 goings-on. According to the organizers, GDC 2011 was an unqualified success, drawing more than 19,000 visitors, the most attendees in GDC history.

“The past week of GDC truly embodied the passion and spirit of the video game community,” said GDC director, Meggan Scavio in a statement.

So, what did you guys think of GDC? Any standout games or news from the show?

G.A.N.G. Awards Logo

The ninth annual G.A.N.G. Awards were handed out this week at GDC. The Game Audio Network Guild, a group dedicated to advancing interactive audio and those who create it, received more than 350 submissions for this year's honors. And just like other awards shows there was one clear favorite among the winners. Press play to see if your favorite game won! And by play we mean Read More.

Read More »

By Dennis Scimeca

Video Games As Art: An Apology For Roger Ebert

When I first read Roger Ebert’s comments on video games and art I knew what he meant, but only because I have an education that touched in large part upon the arts. The word “art” has many meanings, and they all depend on context. The context in which Ebert was using the word was that of High or Sublime art, this being the purest form of art aesthetically, but according to Ebert, “Hardly any movies are art,” either. He said that on April 17, 2010.

This definition of Sublime art was the main thrust of Professor Brian Moriarty’s GDC panel “An Apology for Roger Ebert,” which was more explanation than apology. Professor Moriarty has been in the video game industry for 30 years, but his formal education is in English. It had never even occurred to him to compare video games to the treasures of world literature, or music, or painting, etc. 

“Why are some people in this industry so anxious about wrapping themselves in the mantle of great art?”  Moriarty reflected on the fact that in 25 centuries’ worth of philosophy and aesthetics regarding art, not once have games been considered as such. Moriarty also reflected on the sticky question of what art even is anymore, using the example of a piece of driftwood on the beach. When you first find it, is it art? If you put it on your mantle, is it art then? If you sign it and submit it to a museum, is that when it becomes art?

I get what Moriarty is saying, just like I got what Ebert was saying, but there a meaningful chink in the Professor’s armor. “We can all clearly say what a video game is,” he said, the implication being that we cannot clearly say what art is and therefore a clear line of distinction between the two is to be drawn. But what about the work of developers like Jason Rohrer? Some people call his work games. I don’t necessarily agree. Is Heavy Rain a video game? Even David Cage doesn’t know. The line is not so clearly drawn anymore.

Where Moriarty’s argument became quite compelling was in his discussion of “kitsch” art. The term comes from the mid-19th century, to describe a kind of art based on knockoffs of real masterpieces that were commissioned by the wealthy. The newly-formed middle class wanted some pictures on their walls, as well, so they hired artists to make them paintings which looked like “proper” art, but wasn’t.

Kitsch art is not bad art, but a unique aesthetic category. It depicts objects or themes that are highly charged with simple emotions. It is not rich in relationships between those depicted objects or themes. Kitsch art is popular art, and most popular art is kitsch. And video games are certainly pop art if nothing else. Want to know more? Of course you do, unless you're Roger Ebert. Keep reading.

Read More »

By Dennis Scimeca

Ron Gilbert Takes Us Through The Creation Of Maniac Mansion

Ron Gilbert’s postmortem on Maniac Mansion was less a classic postmortem and more a collection of memories about the game and a trip down memory lane. “How many people in this room weren’t even alive 25 years ago?” he asked. It looked like at least half the arms in the conference room went up.

Maniac Mansion was one of the defining graphic adventure games of the 1980’s and ‘90’s. It popularized the point and click interface that LucasArts became famous for, and coined the word “cutscene.” The inspiration for the title came from Gilbert and colleague Gary Winter’s love for horror films like Reanimator and Creepshow (the purple meteor in Maniac Mansion was inspired by Stephen King’s chapter in the film), and the humorous influences of the play Little Shop of Horrors. Gilbert and Winter were based at the Skywalker Ranch while they developed the game, and much of the inspiration for the Mansion itself came from the Main house at the Ranch where George Lucas’s offices were located.

Read More »


  • News
    (17)
  • Previews
  • Review

By Dennis Scimeca

Dustin Browder Speaks on StarCraft as eSports

When the original Starcraft turned into a national sport in South Korea, I’m sure that Blizzard Software was as surprised as anyone. To the best of my knowledge, it’s a unique phenomenon in the history of video games. Sure, we have MLG, but that can’t hold a candle to the hype, and media circus, and downright pageantry of South Korean professional Starcraft play. So when Blizzard sat down to design Starcraft 2, it was going to be an eSport from the very beginning.

Dustin Browder was new to the company when this work began, and he thought Blizzard was a little crazy. “Games that were five years old had more content than Blizzard had intended from the beginning!” he said. “Units equal choices, choices equal gameplay, and gameplay equals fun, right?” And when Blizzard said that some of the units were going to be the same, Browder couldn’t believe it. “But Blizzard said ‘Don’t worry, this isn’t like other games. This is an eSport. This is different.”

Read More »

ADVERTISEMENT

By Dennis Scimeca

Valve

Mike Ambinder, an experimental psychologist from Valve Software, presented an utterly fascinating lecture at GDC yesterday on how the studio uses biofeedback to enhance gaming experiences.

Valve is renowned for its trailblazing achievements in storytelling, game mechanics, and digital distribution, but what is less popularized outside of accessible game design circles is their pioneering work in new technologies. Like a real-life Aperture Laboratories without the torture, Valve is always tinkering with new techniques to improve our gaming experiences. Want to find out how they tinker and sweat? Read on to find out.

Read More »

By Dennis Scimeca

Doom

DOOM didn’t actually start the first-person shooter phenomena, but it was the title that popularized the genre, and so it’s kind of shocking that we had to wait 17 years for a proper postmortem. Tim Hall and John Romero took the stage at GDC to finally give us a behind-the-scenes look at the development of a title which has become a pillar upon which a huge segment of our industry rests. There's some fascinating information in here, so read on to hear about the beginnings of DOOM.

Read More »


Firelands Raid Not Coming to World of WarCraft in Patch 4.1 -- Blizzard Focusing on Smaller Patches

According to World of Warcraft's lead producer, J. Allen Brack, The Firelands raid won't be available in World of Warcraft: Cataclysm's first large content patch as previously planned. In an interview with Eurogamer, Brack said,  "We feel like the player base isn't really ready for the next raid yet."

Players who raid in the massively multiplayer online role-playing game were a bit taken aback by the announcement, and forum rumblings tell a different story as it seems a lot of people are waiting very impatiently for a new raid tier to satisfy their hardcore interests. The Firelands will be a 10/25 man raid, now releasing with patch 4.2, located in Mount Hyjal where players will once again fight off the molten forces Ragnaros.

Brack also mentioned to Eurogamer that Blizzard intends to change how they release their patch content, saying, "Our plan is to package features into smaller content updates and release them as soon as possible, rather than wait and release larger updates more infrequently."

Read More »

By Dennis Scimeca

Peter Molyneux

Sometimes video games are the products of design documents, planning, and development crunches. Other times, they’re the product of happenstance and alcohol. At least according to Peter Molyneux. “Memories of 20 years ago are slightly hazy,” he said, but told the tale of the development of Populous, a game “born out of confidence and good luck.”

Molyneux had a tiny office in Guildford, England, “which looked a bit like the Amityville horror building.” He had that office because the father of his girlfriend at the time had wanted Molyneux to set up a business for him, named “Taurus Implex Ltd.” The company shipped baked beans to the Middle East. “That’s how I started off in the games industry,” Molyneux said, "Making one cent per can of beans shipped. I dipped into my supply of baked beans myself.” For more beanerific info on Molyneux, keep reading.

Read More »

Newer Posts | | Older Posts

ADVERTISEMENT

Blog Tags

g4tv.com
  • Sara Underwood's Naked Bike Ride

    Posted: June 22, 2011

    1,268,406 Views | 05:20

  • International Sexy Ladies Show: Messy Cat Fight

    Posted: January 27, 2010

    595,142 Views | 00:49

  • Adult Star Kirsten Price Tests Kinect's Nude Filter

    Posted: November 12, 2010

    1,406,665 Views | 04:33

  • Best Nude Scenes in Video Games

    Posted: June 29, 2009

    1,504,491 Views | 03:12

  • International Sexy Ladies Show: Wrestling in Moscow

    Posted: June 19, 2009

    121,735 Views | 01:24

Poll: Are you going to buy a Wii U?

AdChoices