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  • Videos
    (9)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs



Mark Of The Ninja

As I put down the controller after my playtime with Mark of the Ninja, I was struck with the realization that Klei Entertainment may have made one of the most pure stealth games in recent memory. Even with new Metal Gear, Splinter Cell, and Hitman games on the horizon, the genre’s emphasis is increasingly making the shift toward blockbuster action sequences. And yet, a beacon of hope for sneaks and rogues comes from one of the least likely of places.

Mark of the Ninja is a 2D side-scrolling hardcore stealth game, the prospect of which may sound bizarre. The flat plane of a side-scroller isn’t exactly the best suited for sneaking and hiding. And yet, Klei seems to have found just the right balance of mixing a clever interface with ninja acrobatics to pull it off flawlessly.

It helps that direct combat is never a viable option. Though my ninja carried a sword, it was no match for the range of firearms wielded by my enemies. Even running away once spotted was nearly death sentence thanks to the range of their assault rifles. It forces a more thoughtful, methodical pace to the game, which is complimented by its use of light, shadow, and sound.

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Sniper Elite V2 Pre-Order Bonus: Hitler

On the day of his birth, we take a look back at the video game history of the man who's so fun to kill.

Videogames have produces some fantastically evil baddies throughout their history, from Kefka and Kerrigan to Glados and Ganon. And yet one boss appears time and time again who trumps them all. But as one of the most hated and evil human beings to walk the planet, it’s little wonder why Adolf Hitler and his tiny moustache keep showing up in videogames.

Perhaps it’s in part because WWII makes for an attractive setting, with Nazis being the only enemy to garner less sympathy than zombies. But even then, Hitler wasn’t exactly fighting on the frontlines where most WWII games take place. Hitler is that special sort of evil though, the incomprehensibly irredeemable sort that can draw a player in. Because deep down everyone wants to take a shot at him. So what better way to celebrate the day of his birth, than by recounting his plentiful digital deaths?

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  • Videos
    (3)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

  • Videos
    (3)
  • Screenshots
  • Cheats and Walkthroughs

Prince of Persia

Developers Jordan Mechner, Tim Sweeny, John Romero, Adam Saltsman, and Markus Persson came together recently to talk about their indie days. We all start from somewhere, either as just a dreamer in your bedroom or a tinker in the garage. These superstars of today started out much like you with a little skill and a lot of passion for video games.

Prince of Developing

Jordan Mechner, creator of the original Prince of Persia and the upcoming Karateka remake, began developing on the Apple II in 1978. Though his first game didn’t catch on, his second attempt was Karateka, which Broderbund agreed to publish. He didn’t think of himself as indie at the time, originally envisioning Karateka as a AAA title. However, he noted that now working on the remake as an independent developer, he is taking the opportunity to stay true to the spirit of the original rather than the lavish 3D reboot Sands of Time was for his Prince of Persia.

Jordan offered perhaps the most succinct description of what it means to be an indie developer. “The real objective of indie is to start making a game with no idea whether it’s ever going to get published or how that’s going to happen. It’s sort of just taking that leap of faith.”

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A quarter century ago, a little game riffing on the latest 80’s action films rolled into arcades around the world. Contra had arrived, and it was hungry for your hard-earned allowance. With a punishing degree of difficulty, designed specifically to rob players of lives and quarters, it became an instant hit thanks to its over-the-top action and the power ups like the now-iconic spread shot. And in its success, it unwittingly sent ripples through the industry, ripples that still influence games to this day.

Contra

One Man Vs. The World

While Contra’s legacy began in 1987 arcades, it didn’t become a household name until Konami ported it to the NES a year after its arcade debut. The graphics had to be scaled back due to the 8-bit system’s limitations, but all of the power ups, levels, and tough-as-nails gameplay remained intact. Most importantly though, it brought the arcade’s two-player co-operative play to home consoles.

Understand, this was a rare treat on the NES at the time, where multiplayer usually meant passing the controller and waiting impatiently for your friend to fail. Gamers were eager to have an arcade-quality game at home, and parents preferred the one-time purchase over constant quarters at arcades, it was a win for everyone.

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