John Daly's ProStroke Golf Review

By Mike D'Alonzo - Posted Oct 25, 2010

Overall, ProStroke has a lot of things going for it, and a lot of frustrations, as well. The integration of the Move technology, at this point, is vastly superior to Tiger Woods, as it was clearly developed with motion control in mind, but there's just not enough here to make it the sort of game you'll want to play over and over again.

The Pros
  • For the most part, the control scheme works.
  • The practice swing is an invaluable tool.
  • The simplistic approach works for a complicated game like golf.
The Cons
  • The game mechanic and menus are kind of clunky.
  • Not a particularly pretty game.
  • Playing with the Move can be kind of frustrating.

John Daly's ProStroke Golf Review:

John Daly, for those of you who don't know, is the colorful bad boy of golf, with a reputation for wild behavior on and off the course. He's also known for some peculiar wardrobe decisions, like tiger print pants and zubaz, which means you can spot him from a mile off, like a giraffe at a cocktail party. He's also known for his power game, and for hitting the ball a mile off the tee.

Now that you know a little about the subject of John Daly's ProStroke Golf, you should understand the ethic of the game, which, as opposed to, say, Tiger Woods PGA Tour 11, is a little less rigid and a little more focused on the visceral aspect of man vs. ball.
 


 
Grip It And Rip It

Here's the good news. For those of you who aren't into the more complex aspects of golf, ProStroke lets you (for the most part) square up to the ball and hit it as hard as you can. This is not as much a finesse game as Tiger Woods, which means you can play and enjoy the game without having had to spend hundreds of hours on a golf course to understand its ethic. This simplicity carries over to every aspect of the game, meaning that you're not micromanaging your game, but actually spending more time golfing, which is nice.

However, the game is based on unlocking certain activities through a series of challenges, including driving, approach shots, and putting. You'll have to beat John Daly to get to play some of it, though it's definitely skewed in a way that allows you to accomplish this with a modecum of effort.

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Can I Get A Mulligan?

When you're prepping a shot, the view you have is right above the ball. Just aim the Move controller at an imaginary ball, and give it a rip. One of the best things about ProStroke is that you have not only opportunity to take practice swings, but to switch to a camera view that allows you to see where your ball would have gone had you actually hit it, allowing you to adjust on the fly. Once you have it lined up, hit the Move button to make your swing live, and have at it.

This practice swing idea works particularly well when it comes to putting, which can be very frustrating, especially when it comes to aiming. After making five or six small adjustments that still don't work, you will be sorely tempted to just rear back and putt the darn thing, and let the chips fall where they may.

Also, sometimes the camera will not recognize the controller, and you will be forced to walk around your room finding a place that it can actually see, before you can get to your swing. This can also cause your club to appear significantly in front of or behind the ball, when, in fact, you're holding it straight down.
 


 
In The Rough

John Daly ProStroke Golf is not a particularly pretty game, in that the graphics are a little last-generation. The courses aren't rendered to the detail for which Tiger Woods is famous, and the characters are only marginally customizable. You might not mind, if that's not the sort of thing that floats your boat, but don't expect a bucolic day on the virtual golf course from this game.

The menus and navigation are also a bit on the clunky side, and you may often be found choosing the wrong activity, only to find it's a bit difficult to exit out and rectify your mistake. The commentary, provided by Peter Kessler and Sam Torrance, is able enough, though it sometimes gets a little out of sync.
 


 
Par For The Course

Overall, ProStroke has a lot of things going for it, and a lot of frustrations, as well. The integration of the Move technology, at this point, is vastly superior to Tiger Woods, as it was clearly developed with motion control in mind. There's just not enough here to make it the sort of game you'll want to play over and over again. There's certainly something for O-Games to grab on to in the future, though, which is encouraging.

Still want to play it? Why not rent it at Gamefly?